News

A fixture at the co-op for over 20 years,the fruit table was cut up and removed on the morning of February 22nd, 2016.

We are so excited to introduce a new, organic lard just in time for the holidays! All your pie baking needs - bulk flours, fresh apples, organic pumpkin, tons of spices and the lard to make the perfect crust - are here at Hampden Park.

We are happy to announce that Raymond Avenue is back open - just in time for you to come in and order your holiday turkey!

It is often forgotten that the first suggestion of the recycling triad is reduce, the second is reuse, and the third is recycle. Often folks just jump right to the end and recycle.

In early spring, my buddy Kymn shared her joy after an April shower with this Facebook post: “I cheered during yesterday’s rain on our blueberry bushes. It takes about 48 gallons of water to create a pint of blueberries.”

After board member Scott Vargo had to resign for personal reasons, the board of directors is happy to announce the appointment of Deann Lindstrom to the board as of June 1, 2015.

Congratulations to Scott Vargo and Martha Hotchkiss for being elected to the board by the member-owners at the Annual Meeting.

Our annual meeting was again held at the Church of St. Cecilia, a block west of the co-op. At the meeting, several members had questions we didn't have time to answer. Attached and listed below are the questions and their answers. 

—by Naomi Jackson, Membership Coordinator

Hampden Park Co-op is a member-owned neighborhood grocery store. Like other cooperatives, we operate on principles established by the International Co-operative Alliance (<http://ica.coop/>).

The first principle is "Open and Voluntary Membership." According to the ICA website, "Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political or religious discrimination."

At Hampden Park Co-op, this means anyone* may purchase a share of stock (current cost is $30) and participate in the business at whatever level they choose.

—by Roxy Bergeron

Last October, after over a decade of consideration, the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly was finally granted endangered species status by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This tiny flutterer, with its fuzzy orange head and two-inch wingspan set about with a white and orange checkerboard, has evaporated from its range of approximately 70 sites across the prairie grasslands in Vancouver, British Columbia, and the Willamette Valley of Oregon, where the luscious grapes grow for an array of fantastic wines. 1 It's now found in at most a half-dozen sites in the Pacific Northwest, 2 with only one population remaining in the Willamette Valley.

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