News

—by Katharine Holden, HPC Member

Hampden Park Co-op is packed with products you may not have tried yet. Here’s the tune on a few of them:

—by Kate Wagner, HPC member

—by Anne Holzman, HPC Member

[In her newsletter column "Have you tried...", HPC member Katharine Holden tells us about products on HPC's shelves that the reader may not have tried. Here's one:]

[In her newsletter column "Have you tried...", HPC member Katharine Holden tells us about products on HPC's shelves that the reader may not have tried. Here's one:]

[In her newsletter column "Have you tried...", HPC member Katharine Holden tells us about products on HPC's shelves that the reader may not have tried. Here's one:]

In Japan, umeboshi plums are aged under pressure for one year in barrels. Some plums get crushed in this process. In the spirit of waste not, want not, these crushed plums are pureed and sold as umeboshi paste. It adds a tangy flavor to sushi and salad dressings and is used as a condiment on fish, vegetables, and rice. My friend Janelle tells me that umeboshi paste adds a wonderful salty-sweet taste to corn on the cob, but Janelle also likes watermelon chunks in her cornflakes, so take that into consideration.

—by Naomi Jackson, Membership Coordinator

In the past few months, the Membership Committee has been working to expand our co-op’s presence in the local community and to add some social activities to our co-op calendar. We had volunteers representing Hampden Park Co-op at the Global Warming Day of Action on April 14, at the Anaphylaxis and Food Allergy Association conference on April 21, and at the St. Anthonty Park Arts Festival on June 2. We hope to do more such outreach; if you are interested in being a part of this effort, there is a sign-up form on the bulletin board in the kitchen.

[In her newsletter column "Have you tried...", HPC member Katharine Holden tells us about products on HPC's shelves that the reader may not have tried. Here's one:]

You know those little packets that you get with Asian takeout that you save because you might use them someday, and then you never do? That kind of soy sauce is made from fermented soybeans, roasted grains, water, and salt. Tamari is a darker, richer, and more flavorful Japanese soy sauce made with koji instead of roasted grains. Koji is a fungus used to ferment food and is best known for its help in the creation of sake, the Japanese rice wine. Tamari is wheatfree. You can use tamari just as you would any soy sauce. I add tamari to my chili both for the taste and the color.

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