News

Our annual meeting was again held at the Church of St. Cecilia, a block west of the co-op. At the meeting, several members had questions we didn't have time to answer. Attached and listed below are the questions and their answers. 

—by Naomi Jackson, Membership Coordinator

Hampden Park Co-op is a member-owned neighborhood grocery store. Like other cooperatives, we operate on principles established by the International Co-operative Alliance (<http://ica.coop/>).

The first principle is "Open and Voluntary Membership." According to the ICA website, "Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political or religious discrimination."

At Hampden Park Co-op, this means anyone* may purchase a share of stock (current cost is $30) and participate in the business at whatever level they choose.

—by Roxy Bergeron

Last October, after over a decade of consideration, the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly was finally granted endangered species status by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This tiny flutterer, with its fuzzy orange head and two-inch wingspan set about with a white and orange checkerboard, has evaporated from its range of approximately 70 sites across the prairie grasslands in Vancouver, British Columbia, and the Willamette Valley of Oregon, where the luscious grapes grow for an array of fantastic wines. 1 It's now found in at most a half-dozen sites in the Pacific Northwest, 2 with only one population remaining in the Willamette Valley.

—by Nicole Infinity

My wife and I have both worked in schools for several years now and are well versed in lunches the kids bring from home. When the students open up their lunch bags, the first sight is usually packages.

Although we agree that often school lunches leave a lot to be desired, there are many alternatives to prepackaged foods that are both lower cost and lower waste. These alternatives also apply to the lunches grown-ups pack for themselves.

Encourage your family to bring home any part of the lunch they do not eat. We watch mounds of food from home lunches get thrown away each day. Sometimes kids will throw out entire sandwiches or prepackaged snacks.

—by Naomi Jackson

—by Meredith Sommers

—by Monica Rojas

Tahini or tahina is a paste made from ground hulled sesame seeds. Tahini has been around for a very long time. The first written documentation is in a cuneiform document written 4,000 years ago, which talks about the custom of serving the gods a form of sesame wine. Historian Herodotus wrote about cultivating sesame 3,500 years ago by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, where it was mainly used as a source of oil. Tahini is mentioned by name in a hummus kasa, a recipe in an anonymous 13th-century Arabic cookbook called Kitab Wasf al-Atima al-Mutada.

—by Roxy Bergeron, HPC volunteer

Is it too dramatic to call it cancer, this insidious affliction pursuing citrus trees?

Fruit warps into impossible green bitter phantoms of what they might have been, raining from a tree in despair, lying by the dozen on the ground. The tree itself becomes stunted, with deformed roots and yellowed leaves, rife with the lethal bacteria that invaded its phloem—its vascular system—months or even years before. It’s a not-so-subtle end-stage failure, with nothing to be done but thank a tree for its years of fragrant delicious yields, then destroy it.

—by Margot Monson

A Review of Fifty Shades of Kale: 50 Fresh and Satisfying Recipes That Are Bound to Please
by Drew Ramsey, M.D., and Jennifer Iserloh

—reviewed by Nicole Infinity

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